Scott M. Sandridge

A Work in Progress

The End Was Not the End available now on Kindle and Nook!

Copypasta. Yum. 🙂

We wanted everyone to know that The End Was Not the End: Post Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales, the new anthology from editor Joshua H. Leet, is now available on the Kindle and Nook for just $3.99!  Features 11 fanastical tales in a post-apocalyptic setting!

Spread the word and pick up your copy today!

Amazon Kindle:

http://www.amazon.com/The-End-Was-Post-Apocalyptic-ebook/dp/B00C3ZWA58

Amazon Kindle UK:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-End-Was-Post-Apocalyptic-ebook/dp/B00C3ZWA58

Barnes and Noble Nook:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-end-was-not-the-end-joshua-h-leet/1046366357?ean=2940016716923

 

And why should you get it, you ask?

Because I’m in it. Why else?

Sigh. Fine. Here’s what the antho’s about:

 

For Immediate ReleaseMarch 28, 2013

SSP Proudly Announces Cover Reveal of The End Was Not the End Anthology

Seventh Star Press is proud to unveil the brand new cover art by the award-winning Bonnie Wasson for The End Was Not the End: Post-Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales, a fantasy-themed anthology from editor Joshua H. Leet.

In regards to the theme of The End Was Not the End: Post Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales:

Heroes prevail… usually.

You sit close to a campfire, depending on its faint, flickering light to ward off the darkness. Yet the fire cannot hold back dark memories, thoughts of your fallen kingdom, of monsters across the land, of magic gone awry. Around fires like yours are seated other travelers, refugees from catastrophes none dare mention. Kings and queens huddle shoulder to shoulder with peasants, wizards share scraps with slaves, and each wishes only to be saved. Some will be lucky, for heroes yet remain in their lands. For others, hope was not among the provisions stuffed into a pack when fleeing home.

Eventually the silence of the night grows too heavy, and someone speaks. They tell a tale of loss, of foolish pride and tragic mistake. With bravery stoked by company, others speak up, each sharing their own sorrows.  Before long, there are enough tales to fill a volume. The conversations continue through the night, and by the time dawn has filtered through the gnarled tree limbs, journeys must continue, and one by one, the strangers trudge away. Their worlds may have ended, but they have survived another night. They will continue on, seeking to rebuild upon the ruins of great dreams. Their stories linger upon the air, drifting into time like the smoke from their extinguished fires, fed only by faint embers.

This book contains eleven stories set in worlds where an apocalypse has already come, but the characters you’ll read about aren’t quite ready for the end.

The authors and stories featured in The End Was Not the End: Post-Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales include:

Deedee Davies – “The Halls of War”

Desmond Reddick – “Blood and Fire”

Scott Sandridge – “Make Way for Utopia”

Jay Wilburn – “Twenty Year Plan”

Mandi M. Lynch – “Nightmares and Dragonscapes”

Magda Knight –  ”The Stone-Sword”

William Ransom – “In the Hills Beyond Twilight”

Steven S. Long – “Blade of Fire”

Bill Blume – “Waist Deep”

Darra L. Hofman – “Ben”

Nathen Gallagher – “Story’s End”

The End Was Not the End: Post-Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales will be released in the first week of April in Trade Paperback and eBook formats. For further information and updates on The End Was Not the End: Post-Apocalyptic Fantasy Tales, please visit the Seventh Star Press site at http://www.seventhstarpress.com

Contact: C.C. James Public Relations, Seventh Star Press ccjames (at) seventhstarpress.com

Seventh Star Press is a small press publisher of speculative fiction located in Lexington Kentucky

So go get it!

Especially if you like a post-apocalyptic twist to the Arthurian legends… (*Cough!* my story *Cough!*)

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March 31, 2013 Posted by | Writerly Updates | 1 Comment

Announcing Call for Submissions on New Faerie-themed Anthology from Editor Scott Sandridge

For Immediate Release March 15, 2013

Announcing Call for Submissions on New Faerie-themed Anthology from Editor Scott Sandridge

Seventh Star Press announces a call for entries on A Chimerical World: Tales of the Seelie Court/Tales of the Unseelie Court. Edited by Scott Sandridge, the anthology is planned for a special flipbook format which will feature tales fitting the Seelie Court on one half, and tales fitting the Unseelie Court on the other.

Bring out the Fey!  Stories about the Sidhe? Sprites? Pixies? Boggans and Goblins? How about Gnomes?

Looking for fictional stories involving the Fey Folk, both Seelie and Unseelie. From the campy to the deep and esoterical, from traditional faeries to the not-so-traditional (changeling kangaroos, anyone?), Western to Eastern, and perhaps even Martian!

Stories should be between 2,000 and 10,000 words, and the final flipbook will feature approximately 11 stories per side.

Residing in Ohio, editor and author Scott M. Sandridge’s first short story, “Treecutter,” was published in The Sword Review in July 2005. Since then, he’s gone on to publish over 26 more short stories, and over 60 reviews. He has also been a columnist for the Double-Edged Publishing webzines, a Submissions Editor for Ray Gun Revival, and the Managing Editor of Fear and Trembling. Scott is also an active blogger whose site can be found at: https://smsand.wordpress.com

A Chimerical World: Tales of the Seelie Court/Tales of the Unseelie Court will be released in trade paperback and eBook formats in late 2013. The deadline for submissions is July 15, 2013, and full information on the anthology and submission guidelines can be found at http://www.seventhstarpress.com/submissions/

 

 

Contact: C.C. James Public Relations, Seventh Star Press ccjames (at) seventhstarpress.com

Seventh Star Press is a small press publisher of speculative fiction located in Lexington Kentucky

March 17, 2013 Posted by | Writerly Updates | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SpecMusicMuse Review—The Brotherhood of Dwarves, Book 4: Between Darkness and Light

between-dark-and-light-cover-4_final-webThe fourth book of D.A. Adams’s epic fantasy series, The Brotherhood of Dwarves, takes place immediately after the Fall of Dorkhun. Roskin’s father, King Kraganere, is badly wounded, and Kraganere’s advisor, Sondious, has gone insane and usurped the throne. Meanwhile, outside the broken gates of Dorkhun, the Great Empire camps in the valley, preparing for invasion.

To save his father and the KiredurkKingdom, Roskin must unite the other Dwarven kingdoms in an alliance against the empire. Meanwhile, the half-elf, Kwark, sends Vishghu to convince her fellow ogres to aid the Kiredurks despite having just fought a devastating war with them. And Crushaw has a limited amount of time to turn a ragtag mass of elves into an army formidable enough to fight the empire.

And far to the east, a vicious and insane outcast has his own plans for the hero, Roskin.

In many ways, this book is what the three previous books were setting the stage for, BDal-Interior1and if the fifth book turns out the way the fourth book seems to be hinting expect to see some major epic battles to come, battles far greater than the one in here.

Adams has taken classic tropes in the genre that has existed since The Hobbit and has breathed fresh new life into them. While familiar enough to be identifiable, none of the races follow common stereotypes. It is a world more realistic, where not every elf or dwarf is good and not every orc is evil. And not all dwarves live underground: some, like Molgheon, are most at home in the wilderness. It is a world familiar to readers of Epic Fantasy but also possesses the grim and grit of Sword & Sorcery.

BDaL-Interior2Adams makes you care about the characters, about the relationships, and about the world. And instead of characterizing the human-ruled Great Empire in a two-dimensional light, he shows, through an imperial captain, the moral complexities of the choices between loyalty and duty in an empire that is becoming decadent and complacent. You actually feel for what the captain has to go through despite him being one of the enemies.

The series as a whole is one of the best you’re ever going to find, whether from small press or large, and the fourth installment will keep you reading well past your bedtime.

Best to read while listening to: any epic music (Two Steps From Hell perhaps?) or epic fantasy soundtrack (you know which ones).

March 3, 2013 Posted by | SpecMusicMuse | , , , , , | 2 Comments